Wall Street Journal bravely go where few journalist dares “Inside Thailand’s Military Establishment”

So the Thai military, even if does not last long in directly controlling Thailand, with an election and a new constitution, will likely cast a long shadow over Thai politics for a long time. So how powerful is the Thai military?

According to the Wall Strweet Journal, Thailand’s military maching, is a quote: “Thailand’s Divided Military.”

Already, about a month after the coup, the junta has started buying weapons, just like every time Thailand is militarized, as Thailand is trying re-recuperate economically., And that new speedy spending, is on top, of Thailand’s defense spending being at historic high,  for the last ten years or so, since the 2006 coup.

many global press have reported on Thailand’s junta. And the news, is such s the following:

“Military rule in Thailand is likely to last longer than expected and has been more repressive than after the country’s last coup in 2006, a senior US official said. The official told a congressional hearing Washington was still looking at whether the big regional Cobra Gold military exercise held annually in Thailand could go ahead there next year given the military takeover in May. “Initially, we held out hope that – as happened with the 2006 coup – the military would move relatively quickly to transfer power to a civilian government and move towards free and fair elections,” said Scot Marciel, the US principal deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asia.

“However, recent events have shown that the current military coup is both more repressive and likely to last longer than the last one.” Marciel said in testimony to the Asia-Pacific subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee that the coup had put the United States in a difficult position, given that Thailand is a key US ally in Asia.

The following is from the Wall Street Journal (source)

Thailand’s Divided Military

By PAUL CHAMBERS

June 30, 2014 1:09 p.m. ET

Gen. Prem Tinsulanonda’s arch-royalist faction may control the top posts, but most soldiers support former Prime Minister Thaksin.

Thailand’s generals justified last month’s coup as a necessary step to prevent political conflict from escalating. But the military has larger objectives: bringing the loyalists of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra to heel; rewriting the constitution again; and ensuring the dominance of arch-royalist forces at the twilight of the current monarch’s reign.

However, the Thai military is itself riven by factions, making these goals difficult to achieve even after the coup. In a worst-case scenario, the competing forces…….

Get The Full Story: Subscribe

Janes Report (source)

The Royal Thai Navy (RTN) has signed a contract with Saab to procure an undisclosed number of the company’s ARTHUR Weapon Locating Systems radars for use by the Royal Thai Marine Corps, the RTN’s naval secretariat department has announced.

The contract, signed in late June, could confirm that Thailand’s military government is recommencing to modernise the Royal Thai Armed Forces. This procurement process had been halted for several months by political unrest in the country and the military coup that occurred in May.

Further underlining this commitment, a Thai government spokesman revealed to IHS Jane’s on 1 July that it was considering the purchase of medium-range surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) at a cost of USD80 million.

Janes Report (source)

Thailand’s military government is contemplating the procurement of a medium-range surface-to-air missile (SAM) system, a spokesman confirmed to IHS Jane’s on 1 July.

The programme is thought to be the first major military purchase outlined for consideration since the Thai military staged a coup d’état on 22 May.

The detailed specifications of the SAM system have not been revealed.

According to a government document, the potential SAM purchase is valued at THB2.558 billion (USD80 million), with funds to be sourced from the defence budgets through 2014 to 2017.

The government spokesman said that the purchase is under consideration and that the proposal reflected a legacy SAM requirement in the Thai military.

Military rule in Thailand is likely to last longer than expected and has been more repressive than after the country’s last coup in 2006, a senior US official said on Tuesday.

The official told a congressional hearing Washington was still looking at whether the big regional Cobra Gold military exercise held annually in Thailand could go ahead there next year given the military takeover in May.

“Initially, we held out hope that – as happened with the 2006 coup – the military would move relatively quickly to transfer power to a civilian government and move towards free and fair elections,” said Scot Marciel, the US principal deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asia.

“However, recent events have shown that the current military coup is both more repressive and likely to last longer than the last one.”

Marciel said in testimony to the Asia-Pacific subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee that the coup had put the United States in a difficult position, given that Thailand is a key US ally in Asia.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s